• We Tried Mass Surveillance. It Failed.

    We Tried Mass Surveillance. It Failed.0

    Ever since the election, the government has been promising new laws on surveillance powers. Finally the draft bill has been presented, and it has a truly staggering scope. It would allow the state to hack citizens and businesses here and abroad, intercept data in bulk, and force the keeping of all UK citizens’ communications information

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  • After A Bruising Election – What Next For Digital Rights?

    After A Bruising Election – What Next For Digital Rights?2

    The 2015 general election was a bruising campaign with a shocking result. Shocking not just that the Tories managed a slim majority against all expectations, but shocking in its implications for every part of this country’s fabric- housing, the NHS, communities, welfare and the ever more fragile Union. Yet more shocking still is the first

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  • Let’s make being ‘Wrong on Rights’ unelectable

    Let’s make being ‘Wrong on Rights’ unelectable0

    When it comes to the clash between surveillance and civil liberties, it seems the fight is still very much on. It’s a war we have to win and with the General Election looming, making the case that mass surveillance and privacy should be important issues for voters is pretty vital. Happily, on that score, there

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  • The internet ‘blame game’ – watching the watchers

    The internet ‘blame game’ – watching the watchers0

    Problems with the internet including child protection are not being dealt with – government, ISPs, search engines and parents are passing the buck between each other rather than taking action In the United Kingdom, both the coalition government and the opposition have called for the increased use of web filtering to deal with a whole

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  • Three Strikes Struck Out – Lessons for Digital Europe

    Three Strikes Struck Out – Lessons for Digital Europe0

    The French government has just dealt a serious blow to the big entertainment lobby’s assault on the Internet. The Hadopi “three strikes” law has been, well, struck out. The Hadopi measures were introduced in 2009 by President Sarkozy, and threatened to disconnect from the Internet those suspected of online copyright infringement after three written warnings.

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